Trigger finger injection steroid dose

Trigger finger (also called stenosing tenosynovitis) occurs when inflammation builds up within a tendon of a finger and causes it to involuntarily flex. [1] If the condition is severe, the finger gets stuck in a bent position and sometimes makes a snapping sound when forcibly straightened -- sort of like cocking the trigger of a gun, which explains the name. People whose job requires repetitive gripping are at higher risk of developing trigger finger, as are those with arthritis or diabetes. The treatment varies depending on severity and cause, which is why an accurate diagnosis is important.

Dr. Henley explained what he would be doing during the surgery and was very calming in the pre-surgery visit.  I appreciated the follow up call the next day to check on me, I had a couple of questions and they were easily answered during this call.  My follow up visit was good and I was told not to come back unless I had problems, so that was a good thing.  Staff at his office was friendly and courteous as well.  I appreciated that surgery wasn’t the first thing Dr. Henley suggested, he first injected my finger and waited to see if surgery was needed.  That was just a short fix,about 3 months, but it seems as if the surgery has fixed it.  I’m still sore and have a little tingling, but it seems to be getting better, no more painful finger “lock ups”!   

Trigger finger injection steroid dose

trigger finger injection steroid dose

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