Action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

Dr Elliot Shevel is a South African migraine surgery pioneer and the founder and medical director of The Headache Clinic in Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town, South Africa. The Headache Clinic is a multidisciplinary practice dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of Primary Headaches and Migraines. Dr Shevel is also the main author of all scientific publications generated by his team. He recently won a high level science debate in which he was able to prove that the current migraine diagnosis and classification is not based on data. Tertiary Education - Dr Shevel holds both Dental and Medical degrees, and practises as a specialist Maxillo-facial and Oral Surgeon. Follow the Headache Clinic on Twitter@HeadacheClinic .

Inflammation is caused by release of chemicals from tissues and migrating cells. Most strongly implicated are the prostaglandins (PGs), leukotrienes (LTs), histamine, bradykinin, and, more recently, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and interleukin-1. Evidence for their involvement comes from studies with competitive antagonists for their receptors and inhibitors of their synthesis. H1 histamine antagonists are effective for hay fever and some skin allergies such as urticaria, which indicates the importance of histamine in these conditions. Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are alleviated by the aspirinlike anti-inflammatory drugs, which inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase enzyme and reduce synthesis of prostanoids. Corticosteroids prevent the formation of both PGs and LTs by causing the release of lipocortin, which by inhibition of phospholipase A2 reduces arachidonic acid release. They suppress the inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Currently, high doses of nonsedating H1 antihistamines and PAF antagonists are being tested for the treatment of allergic asthma.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to disrupt inflammation cell signaling pathways by binding to the GPR120 receptor. [35] This benefit however can be inhibited or even reversed if the ratio of Omega-6 / Omega-3 is too high as Omega-6 serves as a precursor to inflammatory chemicals ( prostaglandin and leukotriene eicosanoids ) in the body. [36] [37] A high proportion of omega-6 to omega-3 fat in the diet shifts the physiological state in the tissues toward the pathogenesis of many diseases: prothrombotic, proinflammatory and proconstrictive. [36] Omega-6 competes with Omega-3 for the same rate limiting factor which is required for the health-benefits of Omega-3, directly reducing the action of Omega-3 in addition to pharmacologically counteracting Omega-3 benefits through its own action as a pro-inflammatory agent.

Although different NSAIDs have different structures, they all work by blocking cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes. There are two main types of COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Both types produce prostaglandins; however, the main function of COX-1 enzymes is to produce baseline levels of prostaglandins that activate platelets and protect the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas COX-2 enzymes are responsible for releasing prostaglandins after infection or injury. Prostaglandins have a number of different effects, one of which is to regulate inflammation.

NSAIDS have antipyretic activity and can be used to treat fever. [75] [76] Fever is caused by elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 , which alters the firing rate of neurons within the hypothalamus that control thermoregulation. [75] [77] Antipyretics work by inhibiting the enzyme COX, which causes the general inhibition of prostanoid biosynthesis ( PGE2 ) within the hypothalamus . [75] [76] PGE2 signals to the hypothalamus to increase the body's thermal set point. [76] [78] Ibuprofen has been shown more effective as an antipyretic than paracetamol (acetaminophen). [77] [79] Arachidonic acid is the precursor substrate for cyclooxygenase leading to the production of prostaglandins F, D & E.

Action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

Although different NSAIDs have different structures, they all work by blocking cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes. There are two main types of COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Both types produce prostaglandins; however, the main function of COX-1 enzymes is to produce baseline levels of prostaglandins that activate platelets and protect the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas COX-2 enzymes are responsible for releasing prostaglandins after infection or injury. Prostaglandins have a number of different effects, one of which is to regulate inflammation.

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